Broccoli

Broccoli is a newer addition to the low fodmap family – although particular attention needs to be made concerning which parts are low fodmap. Growing conditions and plant storage of FODMAPs affects the fodmap content of foods. A good example here is the ability to use the green parts of leeks and spring onions and not the bulb (the storage part of the plant.) The same is true for broccoli, the leaves and a small amount of stalk (less than 50g) are low fodmap – the stems alone above 50g per portion are not suitable. Testing individual components of food gives us more information about its fodmap content, and we are continuing to learn more about the diet with the valuable testing of the fodmap content of foods. It is thanks to the continued work by Kings College Nutrition department that has led to more information. Increased testing increases available foods and this makes the diet more varied, which is nutritionally more sound, but can add to the complexity of the diet making access to up to date information more critical. The best sources of information are dietitians who are fodmap trained, which is why it is recommended not to complete this diet alone.

What are the benefits of broccoli?

Nutritionally broccoli is suggested to be a powerhouse vegetable, although so are most others in their own way! The infographic above indicates that it has some good cancer-preventing properties via the content of sulforaphane – content of this chemical is affected by cooking time, and its benefits are debatable, as much of the evidence comes from studies in mouse models and cells in Petri dishes, one or two small studies in humans have been done, but certainly more information is needed. Broccoli provides dietary fibre content, which is always important for people with IBS. It contains good levels of vitamin A (more in the tops than the stalks), Vitamin C (but this will depend on how long the broccoli is cooked) and vitamin K.

What are the effects on the colonic microbiome? Well, in a small study broccoli consumption altered the variety of Firmicutes (reduced) and Bacteroides (increased) although it is really too early to say if this is beneficial in IBS or for those following the low fodmap diet. Interestingly Firmicutes have been found to be increased in people with IBS and reduction in the numbers of Bacteroides – perhaps this just represents people with IBS reducing consumption of those foods that are suggested widely on social media to increase symptoms, such as cruciferous vegetables. It would be interesting to know if including broccoli amounts recommended in the low fodmap diet improves these bacteria numbers and whether this is clinically significant.

What broccoli is unlikely to do:

  1. Detox your body – your liver, kidneys and lungs are all you need for this.
  2. Reduce ‘inflammation’ we don’t have enough information that broccoli has any effect for this unspecific term.
  3. Reduce pain in fibromyalgia

I suggest cutting off the stem of the broccoli as close to the head as possible and discarding (or using for other members of the family or feeding to rabbits), then trimming the stalks contained within the base of the head – you can then weight the stems and calculate how much to add to the dish per portion.

What other cruciferous Brassicaceae vegetables are good to include in the low fodmap diet? Pak Choy, choy sum, kale, white cabbage and red cabbage – so do include these as well as other low fodmap vegetables – remember variety in the diet is best!

Now for the recipe:

Vegan broccoli and pine nut pasta – Low FODMAP

Ingredients

300g Gluten free pasta

40g Pine nuts

1 head of broccoli

2.5 cm square of Vegusto Prosociano

1 Tablespoon of garlic infused oil

A few basil leaves

Seasoning to taste

Method

Chop the broccoli close to the head and then into small ‘trees’

Cook the pasta in boiling water using the packet directions adding seasoning

Add 1 tablespoon of garlic infused oil to a pan and roast the pine nuts.

Add the basil, cooked pasta and broccoli to the pan with a tablespoon of water the pasta was cooked in.

Combine and serve with a sprinkling of the cheese for each portion

Serves 4

https://www.nhs.uk/news/cancer/broccoli-and-breast-cancer/

https://modalitypartnership.nhs.uk/self-help/livewell/topics/superfoods/is-broccoli-a-superfood ,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30317146 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4317767/

Maple and muscat grape no bake cheesecake – Low fodmap

Love cheesecake and having problems with lactose intolerance? Then look no further – this recipe is for you! It is a simple recipe and other grape varieties can be used – but for a special dinner party then these muscat grapes do taste a little bit special and really marry with the flavour of the maple syrup used to sweeten this dish. The recipe is for occasional consumption as it is high in calories but as you will know from the other recipes on this website a small amount of the cheesecake can be consumed occasionally. Cheesecake is a wonderful flavour and dessert for a treat. Your dinner party guests will not suspect that you follow a lactose free or low fodmap diet.

Ingredients

2 tubs of lactose free cream cheese

50g maple syrup

1 packet of gluten free biscuits.

40g butter

2 sheets of gelatine

warm water

1 pack of grapes

Method

Crush the biscuits to a consistently sized small crumb

Melt the butter and add the biscuit crumb and mix well

Add to the bottom of a flan dish and flatten to form the base

Chill

Place the lactose free cream cheese in a dish and add the maple syrup (ensure that the maple syrup is free of added fructose syrup.)

Add the gelatin to cold water till soft

Remove and pour on some just boiled water 100ml – just enough to dissolve the gelatin.

Add the dissolved gelatin to the cream cheese mixture

Mix well

Add the cream cheese mixture to the top of the biscuit base and chill

Decorate with grapes and maple syrup drizzle.

Serves 8-10

Cod and celeriac risotto

Ingredients

200g Cod

100g ham

200g celeriac

1 glass of wine

10g thyme

2 bay leaves

1 tablespoon of oil

1/2 teaspoon asafoetida

200ml of lactose free milk

2 teaspoons of cream (lactose free if needed)

Method

Add the cod to a bake-proof dish and cover with milk

Bake in the oven for 15 minutes

Remove milk and retain and flake fish

Add the oil to the pan and then add chopped celeriac, herbs and ham

Fry

Add the rice to the pan and the glass of wine

Cook till the fluid is absorbed by the rice

Add the cream and milk (from cooking the cod) in stages and repeat till fluid is absorbed

Use a small amount of water if needed to finish cooking

The rice should have a small amount of bite when properly cooked

Add the cooked cod and fold through the rice

Taste and add seasoning

Serves 3-4

Pancake recipe for Shrove Tuesday

Here is a savoury choice instead of the sweet varieties of pancake often eaten on Shrove Tuesday. It is a Moroccan themed meal.

Ingredients

Pancake batter

2 large eggs

150g of plain gluten free flour mix

75g of maize flour

500ml lactose free milk

Salt to taste.

Filling

Spinach (1 bag)

1 flat spoon of Moroccan spice mix (check for fodmaps)

1 teaspoon of oil

Juice of 1 lemon

Salt

Topping

6 carrots

Handful of coriander leaves

Salt

2 cooked chicken breasts

Method

Mix all the pancake ingredients together till smooth

Leave in the fridge of at least 2 hours

Fry thin discs of the batter in a frying pan.

Filling

Wilt the spinach in boiling water.

Fry the spice in the oil to release the flavour and add the lemon juice and salt.

Drain the spinach in a colander and blend with the spice mix in a blender.

Topping

Slice and cook the carrot till soft.

Drain and add coriander leaves and salt to taste

Blend till smooth.

Making up the pancakes:

Take a pancake and add some spinach, lay on the top sliced cooked chicken and some of the carrot mix.

Wrap the pancake up and add to a heatproof dish.

Repeat till the dish is full and spread the rest of the pureed carrot on the top.

Warm through and serve with a small amount of pomegranate seeds and alfalfa leaves.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Chicken liver and rosemary stuffing – low fodmap Christmas recipes

Sage and onion stuffing is a classic accompaniment to Christmas dinner, however for people following a low fodmap diet this is not an option because it does contain lots of onion. Perhaps this recipe might be a good alternative and uses up some of the parts of meat that often go to waste, such as liver. I do save gluten free bread to freeze when I have the odd slice, or perhaps the bread crumbles because it is a little stale. Although freezing and reheating can increase the resistant starch content. Most people who get improvements on the low fodmap diet don’t seem to have problems with resistant starches – but if resistant starch does affect you, it might be better to use fresh breadcrumbs and only have a small piece, perhaps.

Serves 8

Ingredients

1 pack of chicken livers

1 tablespoon of garlic infused oil

1 teaspoon of asafoetida

100g of celeriac (gives a flavour of celery)

100g of chopped white cabbage

200g of gluten free breadcrumbs

4 sprigs of fresh rosemary.

Salt to flavour

Method

Trim the chicken livers (remove the tougher membrane that runs between the livers lobes). Add oil to the pan and fry the asafoetida and livers till cooked. Process the cabbage, rosemary and celeriac till a fine texture is achieved and then add the cooked liver and gluten free breadcrumbs. Process till smooth. Add to a loaf tin and cook for 1 hour at gas mark 5 or you could make stuffing balls or sausages depending on your preference but his will affect the cooking time. This stuffing tastes between a stuffing and pate and goes particularly well with Turkey.

I do not put my stuffing mix in the turkey body as this will not reach the temperature needed to cook either the stuffing or the turkey. Do take care when cooking Christmas lunch – do not wash the turkey and ensure any juices from the turkey run clear. Prevention of food poisoning during the festive season is really important!

dscf3977mod

 

Tomato, pepper and spaghetti squash soup

This is a lovely flavoured soup and has a very vibrant colour. A great winter soup to warm you up on cold days!

Ingredients

800g of plum tomatoes

1 large spaghetti squash

400g tin of roasted red pepper

1 teaspoon of ginger

1 teaspoon of cinnamon

500ml water

2 teaspoons of oil

season to taste and sprinkle with poppy seeds

Method

This couldn’t be easier, fry the tomatoes and spices in oil then add the squash, water and red pepper. Cook for 15 minutes and blend using a hand blender. Serve sprinkled with poppy seeds.

Serves 6-8