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Clinical Alimentary

Know your guts, love yourself.

Lactose free rice pudding topped with blueberry brittle

Rice pudding is a real comfort food and often advised for people who need to have nutrition support for weight loss as it is easy to eat and tastes great. If you have lactose intolerance however, this might be a food you wish to avoid. But using lactose free milk means that you can have lactose free rice pudding – a joy!

Recipe

100g short grained rice

1 pint of lactose free milk (more may be required – depending on how thick you like your rice pudding.)

2 tablespoons of lactose free cream

2 tablespoons of table sugar

A handful of blueberries.

Sugar to sweeten to taste

Method

Add rice to the pan and cover with half the milk and cream and bring to the boil.

Keep stirring and adding milk till the rice is cooked.

Taste – then add just enough sugar to sweeten.

Add the two tablespoons of table sugar to a pan with a small amount to water and cook till dissolved. Add the blueberries and coat in the sugar. Add to the top the rice pudding and serve.

Serves 2

 

Garlic – the fodmaper’s enemy?

Garlic contains fructans (an oligosaccharide) and is for some people a potent cause of symptoms in IBS. It is a shame that it does as it is found in many ready meals and processed foods so can be a challenging part of the diet to avoid. Fructans is a non absorbable sugar that increases fermentation in the gut and gives some people with IBS symptoms. Cooking method is the key with avoiding fructans, they are soluble in water and this property means that if you use oil only, to cook the garlic, the flavour is imparted but non of the fructans. As the fructans are not soluble in oil. So, by all means fry your garlic in a small amount of oil then remove the garlic pieces from the pan before adding any water based liquid to the pan, such as stock, sauce or tomatoes. If you don’t wish to do that, then a good option is garlic infused oil, ensure the oil is clear and free of garlic pieces and you should not go wrong.

One reason why it is important to re-introduce fodmaps to the diet is to relax the diet and you might find that you can tolerate a small, or large amount of garlic. This means that you can have foods containing garlic and it makes looking for suitable foods a little easier.

What about wild garlic, or Ramsons? Is it low in fructans? It might be assumed that because the green leaves of spring onion and leek are, so must the leaves of wild garlic. As far as I am aware they have not been tested, so it is wise not to assume. It is also wise, if you do not have an issue with garlic to use the foragers code – if you are unsure of what you are gathering, then don’t pick the leaves. See the image below from Compoundchem.com which explains about poisonous plants that have a similar appearance to wild garlic and you would not want to get them mixed up.

So, is garlic an enemy? For some people, for sure – it results in symptoms but my opinion is that we have no food ‘enemies’. For some lucky people they can eat garlic with impunity. This is always the case with IBS – every situation is different.

If you can eat it the image is a salad based on cucumber, pine nuts, capers, anchovy, pea shoots wild garlic flowers and drizzle of balsamic vinegar – yum.

But if you can’t eat garlic you can impart that glorious flavour in other ways and to see a carpet of garlic flowers in the spring is a joy that is guaranteed not to have any untoward effects!

Quinoa and carrot salad with a herb dressing – low fodmap

This is a salad that is vibrant and although rainbow carrots have been used these are not essential to the dish, it can be made cheaply with plain orange carrots, if needed. The dressing is fresh and adds another dimension to the taste. It is important to use flavourings when fresh garlic and onion are not available to brighten up salad dressings. I have never really got along with quinoa – I find it’s grains hard – but adding grained mustard to it has for me improved the flavour if not the texture of this grain. I like the taste of this dish, so I will be making it again. It is very nice for a light lunch on its own or to accompany meat or fish if you eat them. I wish I could like quinoa a little more, looking at Wikipedia I came across an interesting article suggesting it has potential as a food option for controlled ecological controlled life systems. In other words, Nasa have investigated its properties for use as food in longer term space missions. It has a favourable amino acid profile and can be grown hydroponically to give a good yield. But if this is the only offered grain it looks like I won’t be considering long term space travel soon – I will have to take a large jar of mustard with me if I do!

Ingredients

Dressing

1/2 pack of coriander

1/2 pack of flat leaf parsley

2 tablespoons of garlic infused oil

1 teaspoon of cumin

Season to taste

Quinoa

1 heaped teaspoon of grained mustard

1/2 cup of quinoa

3/4 cup of boiling water

Season to taste

Salad

1 Pack of rainbow carrots

Mixed salad leaves

Drizzle of balsamic vinegar

Few capers for decoration

Method

Dressing

Pour the oil into a blender and add the herbs, cumin and seasoning

Blend till smooth

Heat in a pan to cook the cumin – 5 minutes only are needed just to release the flavour. If you cook it for too long the heat will affect the colour of the dressing. Cool.

Quinoa

Add the quinoa and boiling water to a pan – cook for five minutes and then add the lid to the pan and leave for 20 minutes to cook in the hot water. Cool.

Mix in the mustard and seasoning to taste.

Salad

Peel the carrots into strips along the length of the carrot.

Add the salad leaves

Build the dish

Enjoy!

Serves 3

Chicken and grape salad – low fodmap

This is a quick light lunch for a sunny day. This is a mix of salad leaves, herbs and chicken with grapes. Low fodmap and yummy!

ingredients

1 Carrot

1 roasted chicken thigh

80g grapes

Mixed salad leaves

2 Radish

Drizzle of Balsamic vinegar (don’t exceed 1 tablespoon.)

Fennel leaves

Small handful of parsley

Method

Shred the chicken

Peel the carrot and use the peeler to produce long slices

Slice the grapes

Add all the ingredients on the plate

Serve

Serves 1 – serve with a portion of carbohydrate – a slice of wholegrain gluten free bread or seeded gluten free crackers. Also it is worth mentioning not to have a fruit pudding after this salad you have had the portion for this meal.

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Maple and muscat grape no bake cheesecake – Low fodmap

Love cheesecake and having problems with lactose intolerance? Then look no further – this recipe is for you! It is a simple recipe and other grape varieties can be used – but for a special dinner party then these muscat grapes do taste a little bit special and really marry with the flavour of the maple syrup used to sweeten this dish. The recipe is for occasional consumption as it is high in calories but as you will know from the other recipes on this website a small amount of the cheesecake can be consumed occasionally. Cheesecake is a wonderful flavour and dessert for a treat. Your dinner party guests will not suspect that you follow a lactose free or low fodmap diet.

Ingredients

2 tubs of lactose free cream cheese

50g maple syrup

1 packet of gluten free biscuits.

40g butter

2 sheets of gelatine

warm water

1 pack of grapes

Method

Crush the biscuits to a consistently sized small crumb

Melt the butter and add the biscuit crumb and mix well

Add to the bottom of a flan dish and flatten to form the base

Chill

Place the lactose free cream cheese in a dish and add the maple syrup (ensure that the maple syrup is free of added fructose syrup.)

Add the gelatin to cold water till soft

Remove and pour on some just boiled water 100ml – just enough to dissolve the gelatin.

Add the dissolved gelatin to the cream cheese mixture

Mix well

Add the cream cheese mixture to the top of the biscuit base and chill

Decorate with grapes and maple syrup drizzle.

Serves 8-10

Moroccan roasted vegetables

I love roasted vegetables and these are no exception. This is a Moroccan themed dish using Fodify low fodmap spice mix (purchased) to flavour the gluten free couscous (corn based.)

Ingredients

200g of carrots

1 small bag of mini aubergines (or one large aubergine)

Small handful of green beans

200g of gluten free couscous

2 teaspoons of Moroccan spice mix

15g pine nuts

15g pecan nuts

1 tablespoon garlic infused oil

Grated rind of 1 lemon

Salt and pepper to taste

Spray oil

Method

Spray the vegetables with spray oil and roast in a hot oven till soft

Add couscous to a bowl and add an equal amount of hot water and leave to soften.

Chop the pecan nuts.

Add the oil to a frying pan and add the spices, pine nuts and pecan nuts and lightly toast.

Pour the toasted nuts into the couscous and mix well

Taste and season.

Add the couscous to the serving dish and pile on the roasted vegetables and sprinkle with lemon rind.

Serves 5 – 6

Welsh Rarebit – low fodmap

Welsh rarebit is one of those lunch or supper dishes that is easy to do and as with all cheese dishes, really hits the taste buds to satisfy! How do we make this low fodmap? With a slice of gluten free or 100% sourdough spelt bread that has been through a fermentation process. Make sure you ask about the fermentation process as some breads just have a flavouring added to them – which is not a true sourdough process. Also the flavour of the cheese is enhanced by the addition of 1/4 teaspoon of soy sauce and fish sauce to replace the Worcestershire sauce that is usually a staple ingredient of the dish. Worcestershire sauce contains anchovy sauce – so a splash of fish sauce is not as strange as it appears, Worcestershire sauce does contain onion and garlic so is not low fodmap. Don’t be too worried about adding some fish sauce – this will not taste fishy at all! Also use a hard cheese low in lactose. No salt is needed to be added to this dish – it is naturally salty enough.

Check out Sustain’s real bread finder and the types of sourdough process here https://www.sustainweb.org/realbread/bakery_finder/

https://www.sustainweb.org/realbread/sourdough/ avoid type III sourdough as this may not be suitable for a low fodmap diet.

Ingredients

45g hard cheese

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon mustard

1/4 teaspoon soy sauce

1/4 teaspoon fish sauce

1 slice of gluten free or sourdough bread.

Method

Toast one side of the bread.

Grate the cheese and add to a bowl with the egg, soy sauce, mustard and fish sauce.

Mix well.

Top the bread with this mix and grill till golden brown.

Serves 1

*This recipe is NOT gluten free therefore is not suitable for those with coeliac disease.

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Turmeric roasted parsnips with fennel leaves – low fodmap.

This recipe is based on mini parsnips – they do taste great roasted, even the well done ends are crisp and add a flavour to the dish. Something to pick up the mood on a wet damp bank holiday weekend. Fennel bulb is limited on the low fodmap diet (49g maximum) so do be careful with having large amounts of fennel bulb – perhaps roast it and give the roasted fennel bulb to other members of the family! I hope you enjoy the recipe.

Ingredients

1 packet on mini parsnips

1 piece of turmeric sliced thinly

spray oil

Springs of fennel

Method

Slice the turmeric and spray both the turmeric and parsnips with oil

Add the parsnips to a baking tray and sprinkle with the turmeric and roast till crispy.

Add sprigs of fennel leaves before serving.

Easy!

Chicken, chard and pine nut conchiglie pasta – low fodmap

I adore chard – it is so pretty and very tasty. I have not been able to source a regular supply of it, perhaps because it may be a seasonal leaf. I was surprised and very pleased to find it in a local store, so I bought some to use over the weekend. I always keep some celeriac in the vegetable compartment of the fridge, it replaces the celery flavour of low fodmap dishes and adds a another depth of flavour to the dish. This is a nice spring recipe to start the Easter weekend and herald the start of better weather, lighter nights and fresh food.

Ingredients

300g of dried gluten free pasta

2 tablespoons of pine nuts

4 cooked chicken thighs

30g grated parmesan

I tablespoon of oil

1 slice of celeriac

100g chard

70g spinach leaves

Method

Chop the chard, spinach and celeriac into small slices.

Fry in the small amount of oil with the pine nuts.

Slice the chicken and add to the pan to warm through (must heat the chicken to at least seventy degrees C, if the chicken has been chilled and only reheat it once.)

Grate the parmesan cheese.

Cook the pasta in a pan of hot water whilst the sauce is cooking.

Do take care when cooking gluten free pasta as it is very easy to overcook it and end up with a ball of starch in your pan! Review the cooking instructions on the packet before you start.

Drain the pasta, add the vegetables and chicken and stir thoroughly.

Serve with a sprinkling of parmesan.

Serves 4.

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