Pecan, lime and blueberry bircher low fodmap

What a glorious way to start the day with a yoghurt and oat based creamy breakfast – this recipe contains ground flaxseed to add lots of soluble fibre to your breakfast, a real treat for sluggish bowels! Skyr yoghurt contains lactose – if you are lactose intolerant and are concerned about yoghurt add lactase liquid to the yoghurt. The dose recommended is 5 drops per pint – 4 drops to convert a large pot of yoghurt (450g) for the Biocare liquid lactase product,  it does contain glycerol, which is a polyol, but lactase enzymes should be included after the re-introduction phase of the fodmap diet and you will be aware of whether you need to exclude polyols, although lactase drops are used in very small amounts, usually. Another product available appears to be Colief but this is marketed as infant colic drops at a slightly higher price for 15ml with very similar ingredients. These were the only two brands available when I searched for UK products, do let me know if you use others. It is probably better to treat milk/yoghurt with lactase prior to drinking or using it in recipes, as this forgoes the complex vagaries of digestion – I would suggest digestion is certainly more complex with IBS – the effects other food components in the digestive tract or in recipes may reduce the effectiveness of the lactase. This prepared yogurt needs to be left for twenty four hours in the fridge for the lactase to take effect. However some people with lactose intolerance can manage yoghurt, as the manufacture means a lower level of lactose in yoghurt – go with what you tolerate, once you have completed your fodmap re-introductions you should know how much you can have without symptoms. The yoghurt can then be used to make up the bircher, this is usually left overnight.

Ingredients

200g of low fat low sugar Skyr or thick textured yoghurt

50 mls fluid

1 heaped tablespoon of ground flaxseed

1 teaspoon of lime curd (check labels for any fructose based syrups and avoid)

20g of pecan nuts

1 heaped tablespoon of oats

13g of dried blueberries or 80g of fresh.

Method

Add the flaxseed to 50ml of water, mix well.

Then add the yoghurt, oats, blueberries and lime curd to the mix.

Prepare this recipe the night before and it will be ready for you to eat the next day! Add the chopped pecans just prior to serving to retain the texture. Yum!

Drink a glass of fluid or cup of tea with this for additional fluid to help the flaxseed move through your bowel.

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All ingredients for this dish were purchased.

 

Quinoa deli filler

This deli filler can be used in gluten free wraps, sandwiches and on the top of jacket potatoes and is a really quick easy recipe to make. It has a very fresh taste and is a great option for summer al fresco dining. Just perfect if you want to go out for a picnic or need some alternative ideas for your lunchbox. I used Clearspring organic quinoa trio. Packet quinoa can be used hot or cold and is suitable for a low fodmap diet, just ensure you check the ingredients list before you buy. The recipe does contain egg in the small amount of mayo used to bind the ingredients together. The quinoa contains some oil but you could add a little dressing instead of the mayonnaise, if you are vegan, to bind the rest of the ingredients. You could also cook your own quinoa but this would defeat the point of making this dish as easy as possible so you can quickly make your sandwiches or wraps and get outside in the sunshine, for a picnic perhaps!

Ingredients

1 packet of Clearspring Quinoa

6 radishes

5 chives

3 tablespoons of pine nuts (these are expensive – leave them out if you wish)

150g of white cabbage

2 roasted peppers (use roasted from a jar to save time)

3 heaped teaspoons of extra light mayonnaise

Method

Wash the vegetables.

Slice the radishes thinly, chop the white cabbage, chives and the peppers

Empty the packet of quinoa into a dish

Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well.

Taste, then season if needed – the ready made quinoa already contains salt, I certainly didn’t need to add any extra.

Serve.

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(The quinoa was purchased by me, other makes of quinoa can also be used in this dish if needed.)

Allergy + Free From Show talk on IBS

Are you going to the Allergy + Free From Show in July? Don’t forget to get your free tickets here http://bit.ly/1Pga0N5 and come and see my talk for the IBS Network on Diet and Constipation – is it just about fibre and fluid?

This is on Sunday 10th July in the Learning Centre at 11:00am – come early as seats do fill up fast! If you want to see some of my talks given at previous shows check out my LinkedIn account http://bit.ly/1X8Vgav

I look forward to seeing you there!

Smoked maple chicken – Low fodmap tray bake

One of my favourite recipes is an Ottolenghi dish based on chicken, cinnamon, onion, hazelnuts and honey – a middle eastern baked chicken recipe that I cook for special occasions. Obviously this is certainly not advisable for those people following a low fodmap diet, I have changed this recipe and it certainly does taste just as good as the original! I didn’t need to add any salt and pepper to the dish as my palate is used to not using them and bacon is very salty, you can add a small amount if needed, but do taste if first!

Ingredients

1/2 white cabbage

4 teaspoons maple syrup (make sure it has no fructose-glucose syrup added)

1 heaped teaspoon of asafoetida

1 teaspoon of cinnamon

6 skinless chicken thighs

6 rashers of smoked bacon (fat removed)

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

50g of chopped pecan nuts

Method

Wrap each chicken thigh with bacon – wash hands after using raw meat and any utensils used – do not wash the chicken thighs before use.

Chop cabbage thinly

In a small pan add vegetable oil, maple syrup and spices and heat gently to release the aroma.

Add the cabbage to a roasting tray

Pour over the spiced oil and mix well with cabbage

Place chicken thighs on the top and leave in the fridge for a couple of hours to marinade.

Heat an oven to gas mark 6, 220 deg.C and bake for 30 minutes.

Chop the pecan nuts and sprinkle over the bake and bake for a further 5 minutes.

Chop chives over the dish to serve.

Serves 4-6 people depending on the size of the chicken thighs. Serve with boiled rice and green salad.

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Rhubarb cordial

Rhubarb is one of my favourite vegetables – yes you heard right – it is a vegetable, a stalk, but with a glorious colour and taste. It marries very well with ginger. Rhubarb has an anecdotal use as a laxative in herbal and Chinese traditional medicine but paradoxically it is also suitable for a low fodmap diet. The leaves contain high levels of oxalic acid and are toxic so not to be consumed but the stalks are very popular around the Calder valley – perhaps because we are not too far from the rhubarb triangle.

What about the chemistry of rhubarb – well Andy Brunning of Compound Interest has produced the following excellent graphic.

The-Chemistry-of-Rhubarb

I can find no RCTs for the use of rhubarb as a laxative or its use to assist in ameliorating any symptoms in IBS so I can only assume that the anecdotes are just that but the information in the graphic is very interesting, non the less. But what about recipes – to make a rhubarb cordial and puree see the recipe below which makes around a pint of cordial.

400g of rhubarb

1 inch stick of ginger

Adequate water to cover the rhubarb in a pan

Sugar or sweeteners (not polyol based) to individual taste.

Wash and slice the rhubarb stalks, peel and chop the ginger and add to a small pan. Cover with water and cook till very soft. Add sugar (I used just enough to remove the tart taste.) Pass through a sieve or blend. then cool and add to a bottle – I used the one in the image it once contained rhubarb liqueur. The pureed rhubarb that remains in the sieve can be used to add to lactose free yoghurt as a breakfast fruit puree. Store the cordial in the fridge – you can either drink it cold or warm. Sweeteners will work just as well in the cordial and for those ‘nutrition evangelists’ that decry sweeteners as toxic- we have NO evidence that they are harmful and if they are used to reduce energy consumption for weight management or for diabetes management, then that surely has to be a benefit?

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Ginger, pumpkin and rice noodles Low Fodmap

This tasty recipe can be served with fish or chicken but it can be used as a lunch meal – hot or cold by itself, if you don’t eat meat. The noodles were ginger and pumpkin rice noodles – gluten and wheat free and suitable for a low fodmap diet, they are made by King Soba.

Ingredients

150g of noodles

1 teaspoon of cumin seeds

1 tablespoon of pumpkin seeds

1 tablespoon of pine nuts

2 carrots

Spray oil or 1/2 teaspoon of garlic infused oil

A few drops of soy sauce.

Method

Cook the noodles till soft in boiling water with a small amount of salt.

Peel then trim the carrot till the sides are straight and peel down the length of the carrot to produce strips, then cut them in half lengthwise. This makes thin strips that can cook quickly in a wok.

Add the oil to a wok and fry the cumin seeds for a few seconds to release the flavour.

Add the pine nuts and pumpkin seeds and a few drops of soy sauce (ensure gluten free if you have both IBS and coeliac disease.)

Then add the carrot and cook till softened.

Add the cooked noodles and mix well, then serve.

Serves 2.

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I use these noodles regularly and the dish was made from stock from my store cupboard.