Colcannon (low fodmap)

I haven’t written anything for some time – do forgive me for that, I think I perhaps needed a break but now I am happy to continue with this blog with new vigor.

This heartening meal is a traditional Irish dish that is made from simple ingredients and is cheap and filling. Potatoes are an excellent low FODMAP staple food and white cabbage in the place of the more traditional savoy cabbage means it is suitable for a low fodmap diet.

This dish is lovely served on it’s own or is suitable to be served with gammon or grilled sausages and will brighten up any dreary rainy day!

Ingredients

Serves [4]

  • 200g white cabbage
  • 500g potatoes (floury potatoes work best – Maris Piper, King Edwards, Desire)
  • 15g butter
  • 60g spring onion leaves (don’t use the white part as this contains fodmaps)
  • 200ml lactose free milk
  • 15g chopped bacon

Salt and pepper

Method

  • Wash the potatoes and remove the outer leaves from the cabbage (or you could just wash it.)
  • Boil the potatoes in water until soft, keep the skins on as this is a good source of fibre and will keep the potatoes from going soft in the water.
  • Chop the cabbage and bacon.
  • Fry the cabbage, spring onion leaves and bacon with the butter until soft.
  • Mash the potatoes with lactose free milk and season well, then mix the cabbage and bacon through the potato
  • Serve hot

Published by

Jules_GastroRD

I am a state registered dietitian and advisor to The IBS Network, the UK charity for people with irritable bowel syndrome. My speciality is dietary treatment of gut disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, crohns disease, ulcerative colitis, coeliac disease, lactose & fructose malabsorption and multiple food intolerances. I have had lots of experience in other areas of dietetics and I wished to start this blog to spread the word about evidence based dietary treatments and dispel much of the quackery that is common with these diseases. All information on this site is of a general nature and is based on UK based treatments and guidelines. Please see your healthcare practitioner should you need more country specific information.

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